Luxury of choice

Trial update – No update is no update. That is all there is. As soon as I know, I will tell you all.

But, I wanted to talk about choices today. We all have choices in most of what we do, but especially in what we eat and how we react to situations.

The Luxury of Choice really is directed at the people who are saying that hey don’t want to take a medicine for Celiac disease. They have the luxury of making a decision about their health because of the brave, strong people who have been through clinical trials helping test these new medicines. They have the luxury of making a decision regarding their health because scientists have poured their hearts and souls into creating a medicine that will be safe and effective.

The Luxury of Choice is something that all Celiac sufferers should look forward to having. With Celiac, right now, we don’t have the luxury of choice. We have to manage our gluten free diet all on our own without any help or support. We are typically given this diagnosis and then have to navigate this gluten-filled world without much help or support. Living a gluten free life is exceptionally difficult with a steep learning curve. It probably takes over a year to figure out the diet completely. Even then, veterans of the gluten free diet still make mistakes because the rules are always changing.

So, I look forward to the days when we have the luxury of choice. The day that we have an arsenal of arrows in our quiver to fight this terrible disease. We will be able to use the arrow of medicine combined with the bow of a gluten free diet to hit the bulls eye of good health.

That’s what has been on mind for the last couple of days. I could probably rattle on, but I won’t. I think my archery metaphor is fabulous and I should end it there. 😉

One thought on “Luxury of choice

  1. Thank you, thank you, THANK YOU! for saying that “We are typically given this diagnosis and then have to navigate this gluten-filled world without much help or support. Living a gluten free life is exceptionally difficult with a steep learning curve. It probably takes over a year to figure out the diet completely. ” I have gotten so frustrated with what seems to be some rather patronizing comments on how ‘it’s really not that bad’ or ‘you’re making too much of it’ and ‘it’s not really limiting your diet’ and/or ‘lifestyle’. !!!! What disease do these people have and what did they eat before diagnosis?
    I think three times one of my doctors has mentioned whether I’d like to speak to a dietician and I’ve said yes. Crickets. Never heard a word from anyone. My ‘help’ was, “You need to be gluten free.” Then I got the look that says ‘did you understand me?’ Um, kind of.
    I was left with that, went home, and have been researching and learning ever since, with, as you said, no support or help or … anything. I try to be positive. I try to think about what the heck people did before having this marvelous resource at my fingertips – the internet. I try to remember that I can eat and some people have trouble finding anything to eat at all. I try. But I really appreciate someone acknowledging that it is hard at times and you feel afloat in the middle of a vast sea with no landmarks. You can strike out in different directions, but it’s blind and you’ll go the wrong way a lot. Thank heavens for people like you and the other folks who put together sites to trade info and news and support. I AM grateful, but I’m human and Krispy Kreme and pizza joints taunt me. 🙂

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