Why to participate in celiac disease clinical trials?

here are a variety of clinical trials out there for those with celiac disease. Some are observational – where you just report to the researchers what you ate or how you felt. Some are investigational – where they are testing a new drug or treatment for celiac disease. Some require gluten ingestion, some don’t.

EPI and Celiac

Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI) and celiac disease may be common cohorts. Today we will discuss the pancreas functions, what EPI is, and what the research says about celiac and EPI.

Been missing….

Sorry everyone, I’ve been missing writing about celiac disease. With the election, life, a new job, and a tween that is making me crazy, I’ve been remiss in keeping up with this blog.

What does “Gluten free” mean?

In my mind, gluten free means any food item free from any gluten containing ingredient. However, that probably isn’t good enough for everyone. So, the United States Food and Drug Administration clarified the definition of gluten free. Today is all about labels!

Boredom

Gluten free food boredom is a real thing. Many times, those of us with food issues like to stick to the same foods because we know they are safe and we won’t get sick. I think this is both good and bad.

Gluten introduction and babies

Expecting a baby is nerve racking and exciting time. Parents can begin to introduce solid foods at 4 to 6 months. For most, this is a very exciting time. But for those with celiac, moving to solid foods can be a time a of great concern. If a parent or sibling has celiac disease, there is a much greater chance that the child will have celiac disease. So, when is the best time to introduce gluten containing foods to at risk children?

Controlling celiac

The only “cure” for celiac disease is a gluten free diet. No medicine or pills can degrade the gluten to alleviate the autoimmune cascade associated with celiac disease. I think we need to talk about control rather than the gluten free diet being a cure.

Wild, wild west

For the most part, I often feel like celiac disease is the wild west. Science knows a lot about celiac disease. It is the only autoimmune disease with a known trigger – gluten. When gluten is removed from the diet, all is supposed to be okay. But many people diagnosed with celiac don’t get to “healthy”.

Celiac and the Liver

here are over 300 symptoms of celiac disease. When untreated, celiac can affect every part of the body. The liver can be affected by celiac and you need a liver to be alive. Today, we will talk about what the liver does and how celiac can affect the liver.

Celiac and weight

The classic picture of someone with celiac disease is underweight with a history of diarrhea. This picture is changing with more and more asymptomatic, overweight, constipated, anemic, or those with a constellation of vague symptoms being diagnosed with celiac disease. But today, we are going to focus on weight.